Mississippi State University Sports News
MBK - D.J. Stewart Jr. - 2019-20 - Sam Houston State

by Matt Dunaway, Associate Director/Communications
 
STARKVILLE – The Mississippi State men's basketball team will face Minnesota over the next two seasons as part of a home-and-home series announced Thursday.
 
The Bulldogs and Golden Gophers will first meet at Williams Arena in Minneapolis on Wednesday, December 16 followed by a return matchup in 2021-22 at Humphrey Coliseum on a date to be determined.
 
The two programs have never faced each other in basketball. Most recently, Mississippi State took on Nebraska and Penn State from the Big Ten Conference during the 2018 NIT.
 
Minnesota posted a 15-16 record in 2019-20 after making NCAA Tournament trips during two of the previous three seasons under Richard Pitino. The Gophers were led by All-America selection Daniel Oturu (20.1 PPG, 11.3 RPG, 2.5 BPG), who has declared for the NBA Draft. Marcus Carr (15.4 PPG, 6.7 APG, 5.3 RPG) also has put his name into the NBA Draft process but is maintaining his college eligibility. 
 
The 2019-20 non-conference schedule already includes the Cancun Challenge on November 24-25, where Mississippi State will be joined by Clemson, Illinois State and Purdue. The Bulldogs also are slated to meet Dayton on December 12 in Atlanta and play host a SEC/Big 12 Challenge matchup on January 30 at Humphrey Coliseum. 
 
Mississippi State won 11 of its last 15 SEC games to earn a top 4 finish in the conference standings, the program's highest overall regular season finish since 2010-11. The Bulldogs have tucked away three consecutive 20-plus win seasons under sixth-year coach Ben Howland, and the first time dating back to the 2007-08, 2008-09 and 2009-10 seasons. The 68 victories are the fourth-highest total in program history for a three-year span.
 
Visit www.HailState.com for the latest news and information on the men's basketball program. Fans also can follow the program on its social media outlets by searching 'HailStateMBK' on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

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Brad Davis Community Service Award Graphic

by Josh Lively, Assistant Director/Communications
 
BIRMINGHAM, Alabama – Mississippi State's Kody Schexnayder of football and Athena Yang of women's golf were named 2019-20 Brad Davis Community Service Award Winners, as announced by the Southeastern Conference on Thursday.
 
Schexnayder and Yang will each receive a $5,000 post-graduate scholarship provided by the SEC and are nominees for the Male and Female Brad Davis Community Service Leaders of the Year, which grants a $10,000 post-graduate scholarship.
 
The SEC Community Service Post-Graduate Scholarship is named for former Associate Commissioner Brad Davis. Davis succumbed to cancer on March 2, 2006.  He had been a member of the SEC staff since 1988, first serving as an assistant commissioner until 1994 when he was promoted to associate commissioner.
 
Schexnayder has been volunteering with numerous local organizations during his four-year career, including the Pink Dawg Walk for Breast Cancer Awareness, Walk to School Day, Salvation Army Red Kettle Campaign, Emerson Elementary School Reading Day, Miracle League, Boys and Girls Club, Special Olympics, Palmer Home for Children and visits to the Blair E. Batson Hospital for Children.
 
A New Orleans native, Schexnayder also served on the Community Outreach Sub-Committee of MSU's Student-Athlete Advisory Committee and the SEC Leadership Student-Athlete Advisory Committee.
 
Logging nearly 50 hours of community service during her time at Mississippi State, Yang has actively been involved in annual projects such as the T.K. Martin Fun Run, United We Feed Food Drive and MLK Service Day. This year, she served at the West Point Clay County Animal Shelter.
 
Visit www.HailState.com for the latest news and information on Mississippi State athletics. Fans also can follow the Bulldogs on their social media outlets by searching 'HailState' on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

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Christian Quinn

by Brian Ogden, Assistant Director/Communications

STARKVILLE
Senior outfielder Christian Quinn has been named to the 2020 SEC Community Service Team, the league announced on Wednesday.
 
Quinn was a member of Bulldogs CARE, a service group led by student-athletes to have a positive impact on campus and the city of Starkville. In her two years in Starkville, she has been involved in numerous walks and fun runs for charity.
 
The Hattiesburg, Mississippi, native has volunteered at the T.K. Martin Fun Run, benefitting T.K. Martin Center for Technology and Disability on campus. She has also participated in the Pink DAWG Walk and Race for a Cure to support breast cancer research and the Geaux Teal Walk to raise awareness of ovarian cancer in honor of Alex Wilcox.
 
Quinn has taken her energetic personality on the field and put it to good use with the Special Olympics, where she led a cheering section for the athletes competing with special needs. In addition to her studies and competition, Quinn has facilitated multiple camps with the softball program where she helped run the camp store and monitored the camp bank. She has also assisted with MSU's new student-athlete orientation and was named to the SEC Honor Roll.
 
Quinn is one of four Bulldog seniors who will return for the 2021 softball season. She played in 23 games and started 11 contests while hitting for a career-best .207 average and stealing five bases in the shortened season.
 
For more information on the Bulldog softball program, follow on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram by searching "HailStateSB."

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Tied Spikes

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. – Two members of the Track and Field squad at Mississippi State were named to the Southeastern Conference's Community Service Team in Malcum Tatum and Stephanie Peterson, the SEC continuing to honor their student-athletes' work in the community despite the season on the track being cut short.

Tatum, a senior sprinter for the Maroon and White, has been active in the community ever since arriving in Starkville. He was one of six Mississippi State athletes to take part in a two-day service trip in December 2019 in Shaw, Miss., serving the community as part of the MSU Student-Athlete Development Office's 'Bulldogs in the Delta' initiative. He and the group worked with Delta Hands for Hope, assisting in painting and working on a facility in the local school district, and then surprising the kids with Christmas presents at their after-school program. On the second day, Tatum and crew worked with the West Tallahatchie Habitat for Humanity and helped put up drywall and install insulation in a home that went to a mother of two. The Charlotte, N.C. native has also served food at Peter's Rock Baptist Church in Starkville after services and participated in the Pink Dawg Walk for Breast Cancer Awareness.

In the 2020 Indoor season, Tatum placed third in the 600m and was third in the 4x400m relay at the Blazer Invitational, had a fifth place finish in the 4x400m relay and ran in the 800m at the Vanderbilt Invitational, and had an eighth-place finish in the 400m at the Power 5 Invitational as well as a third-place finish in the 4x400m relay at the meet.

Peterson, a redshirt junior distance runner, has accumulated 225 community service hours while at Mississippi State. She is an active volunteer in FBC Starkville's youth ministry, is a mentor to a group of first grade girls at StarKids every Wednesday, and participated in a one-day event where she served as a counselor to a group of second grade boys by leading them in games and singing. The Chattanooga, Tenn. native also participated in Parents Night Out where she provided free overnight child care to parents in FBC Starkville's Harbor Program. Peterson served children and their families breakfast at Breakfast at the Farm, also acting as a tour guide to show them a working dairy farm in an effort to educate about where their food comes from. Her extensive list of community service activities continues with the T.K. Martin Fun Run, United We Feed Food Drive, and spending time at the Boys and Girls Club, Carrington Nursing Center, and the Chattanooga Area Food Bank.

On the track, Peterson competed in both the 3000m and 5000m in the Indoor 2020 season, finishing in seventh at both the Blazer Invitational and the Vanderbilt Invitational, respectively.

2019-20 SEC Track and Field Community Service Team
Gabe Serrano, Alabama
Alexa Cruz, Alabama
Nick Hilson, Arkansas
Joy Ripslinger, Arkansas
Ryan Lee, Auburn
Hannah Tarwater, Auburn
Chantz Sawyers, Florida
Lauren Ghee, Florida
Nicholas Yanek, Georgia
Tiffany Yue, Georgia
Molly Leppelmeier, Kentucky
Arthur Price, LSU
Annie Jung, LSU
Tyler Moore, Ole Miss
Maddie McHugh, Ole Miss
Malcum Tatum, Mississippi State
Stephanie Peterson, Mississippi State

Darrell Singleton Jr., South Carolina
Briana Reckling, South Carolina
Nate Harper, Tennessee
Megan Murray, Tennessee
Devin Dixon, Texas A&M
Brittany Parker, Texas A&M
Regan Clay, Vanderbilt

In a continuing effort to recognize the accomplishments of student-athletes beyond the field of competition, the Southeastern Conference names a Community Service Team for each of its 21 league-sponsored sports, looking to highlight student-athletes from each school who gives back to the community through superior service efforts.

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Christian MacLeod

by: Greg Campbell, Assistant Director/Communications

TUSCON, Ariz. –
After winning his first four career starts, Mississippi State baseball redshirt-freshman Christian MacLeod was tabbed as a third-team All-American by Collegiate Baseball Newspaper on Tuesday (May 26).
 
MacLeod is the first Mississippi State freshman to earn an All-America nod since Jake Mangum in 2016 and gives MSU an All-America starting pitcher for the second straight season. He is the 49th baseball student-athlete to garner All-America accolades and his selection marks the 122nd overall selection for a Diamond Dawg.
 
The lone Power 5 freshman to register four-or-more victories on the season, he also tied for the most strikeouts among Power 5 freshmen in 2020. His four victories tied for No. 2 nationally and tied for the SEC lead in the category. Overall, MacLeod was also among the top 50 nationally in hits allowed per nine innings (25th; 3.86), WHIP (32nd; 0.71) and ERA (41st; 0.86).
 
MacLeod had an impressive collegiate debut with 11 strikeouts on February 15 versus Wright State, marking the most strikeouts in a freshman collegiate debut in MSU history. A 12-strikeout effort versus Quinnipiac made him the only freshman in the NCAA with multiple double-digit strikeout games in 2020. His two double-digit strikeout games equal Paul Maholm (2001) and Eric DuBose (1995) for the most by a rookie in MSU history.
 
In four starts on the mound, MacLeod led the team in strikeouts (35), innings pitched (21.0) and wins (4), while ranking first among qualifying MSU pitchers in ERA (0.86) and opponents' batting average (.127). The left-hander held opponents to two-or-fewer runs in all four starts and fanned seven-plus batters in three of four starts. He issued one-or-fewer walks in three of four starts and allowed just two extra base hits on the season.
 
Along with his All-America selection, MacLeod earned a spot on the SEC Community Service team and was selected the SEC Pitcher of the Week on February 17 after an outstanding season debut against Wright State.
 
The Diamond Dawgs wrapped up the shortened 2020 season on a five game winning streak to post a 12-4 overall record, including a sweep of No. 2 Texas Tech in the final two games of the campaign. More information on the 2020 season can be found in our season wrap-up.

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Aspen Wesley

by Brian Ogden, Assistant Director/Communications
 
STARKVILLE – Trailing 4-0, head coach Samantha Ricketts made the call for the freshman. It was the second time, she'd gone to a newcomer in Mississippi State's Opening Day exhibition against the United States Olympic Team.
 
For the first appearance of her college career, Aspen Wesley was asked to step into the circle against Olympians.
 
"I could not tell you how nervous I was," Wesley said. "Coach Ricketts, she could even tell. Usually I have this straight face, so no one ever can tell if I'm like mad, angry, just sad or happy. My face is usually always the same, but you could so tell by my face. I was shaking."
 
The nerves showed at first. Wesley walked the leadoff batter on a 3-2 pitch. She responded by getting a pop out on a 1-1 count but greeted her third batter with a pair of balls. Then she settled in.
 
Wesley got a called strike then threw the next two pitches past a swinging Michelle Moultrie for the second out. After battling back to a full count on her fourth hitter, she induced a ground ball to end the inning.
 
"I didn't know how I was feeling," she said. "Ricketts was like, 'Aspen, you can smile now,' and after she said that I could not quit smiling."
 
The freshman considers that debut as her proudest moment of the season, not just for her performance on the field, but also what it symbolized for the people watching her.

"I didn't know how I was feeling. Ricketts was like, 'Aspen, you can smile now,' and after she said that I could not quit smiling."
 
Wesley is a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and grew up in the Pearl River community on the Choctaw Indian Reservation outside of Philadelphia, Mississippi. She just calls it the Rez. She sees playing softball as her way to inspire the next generation little girls in her tribe.
 
"We know that the Rez is here," she said. "It's always going to be the same. My mom and dad have always told me they have been on the Rez their whole life, my grandma, my grandpa, my family. They're asking me to go out. It feels like it's hard leaving everybody, but, like I said, the Rez is always here, and it's not going anywhere."
 
Mississippi State was one of the first schools to reach out to the state's four-time Gatorade Player of the Year. Wesley wanted to stay close to home, so her family and the rest of the tribe could watch her play. The Bulldogs checked those boxes.
 
"They made it very easy," she remembered. "They were the first ones to offer me, and just talking to them, I felt like I was talking to a friend. The tribe is right here close to me, and there's so many little girls that say they want to be me. I love that they come to watch my games."
 
Wesley is an inspiration to her family still living on the Rez. She always heard about how athletic her parents were. Her mom would have loved to play sports in college, but never got the chance because she had to raise her.
 
She admits there's also a bit of stigma around leaving the tribal land. It's just not that common. For a girl to leave to play sports was also a bit unusual.
 
Women now play sports in the tribe alongside the men, but it hasn't always been that way. The tribe plays a game called stickball that is similar to lacrosse. Girls and women weren't allowed to play until the 1990s. That's no longer the case, and the World Series of Stickball is Wesley's favorite part of the annual Choctaw Indian Fair.
 
"We play stickball with boys, up until we're like 18," she said. "The girls, they get tackled, just like how boys get tackled, but, you know what? They get back up, and they play with the boys."
 
We play stickball with boys, up until we're like 18. The girls, they get tackled, just like how boys get tackled, but, you know what? They get back up, and they play with the boys.

Each of the eight Choctaw communities fields a team, and a group from Oklahoma comes each year as well. There are also some independent crossover teams made up of family members that may live in different communities.
 
Wesley quickly invited anyone to come witness the game themselves the next time the tribes meet. She wishes everyone could get a chance to see it at least once.
 
"It's a fun week of traditional food, Choctaw arts & crafts, traditional Choctaw dancing, the Choctaw Indian Princess pageant and the World Series of Stickball," she said. "Anyone is welcome to play and watch."
 
When Welsey steps in the circle at Nusz Park, she broadcasts those facts to anyone close enough to hear. Her walkup music is "Stadium Pow Wow" by A Tribe Called Red and the tribal drums echo through the stands while she warms up.
 
She first heard the song at one of her high school games, and her parents suggested it would be a good match for her. Wesley forgot about the song in the fall until her parents reminded her about it. The first time it played over the loudspeakers, it reminded Wesley of who she was playing for.
 
"When it played, I just felt more connected," she said. "I headed out to the mound all nervous, and it just hit differently than hearing it in my headphones. It calmed me down, and I felt like I could breathe."
 
It's another way she demonstrates the pride she takes in her culture. She wants it to be known that yes, she's a Native American, and yes, she can play softball at the highest level.
 
Her parents missed her first scrimmage at State in the fall, but her aunt brought her cousins. Wesley describes her cousin, Emma, as her "tail." She follows her everywhere and wants to do everything she does.
 
In high school, Wesley wore No. 8. When she got to MSU, where that number is retired in honor of Alex Wilcox, she switched to No. 28. Emma will only wear those two numbers when she plays.
 
A few other Choctaws came out to the park that day as well. The younger girls surrounded her, asking to take pictures.
 
"I want them to come watch me so they know that they can do it," Wesley said. "There are other natives out there that play sports, that play at the next level, but I am the first Mississippi Choctaw pitcher to play in the SEC. I just want them to know that I started where they're at right now and they can do it also."

'"When

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Christian MacLeod

by: Greg Campbell, Assistant Director/Communications

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. –
While the 2020 season was cut short on the field, the Southeastern Conference continues to honor its student-athletes that excelled in the community during the 2019-20 academic year and Mississippi State redshirt-freshman Christian MacLeod was selected to the SEC Baseball Community Service Team.
 
MacLeod has been active in the community over the past two seasons, including his redshirt season in 2019. One of the leaders in community service on the Diamond Dawg roster, the Huntsville, Alabama, native has participated in the annual Salvation Army Red Kettle program, is active with the Fellowship of Christian Athletes and spent time helping the Challenger League, which assists children with disabilities play the game of baseball.
 
On the field, MacLeod made a loud debut with 11 strikeouts versus Wright State in his collegiate debut, marking the most strikeouts in a collegiate debut in MSU history. A 12-strikeout effort versus Quinnipiac made him the only freshman in the NCAA with multiple double-digit strikeout games in 2020. The lone Power 5 freshman to register four-or-more victories on the season, he also tied for the most strikeouts among Power 5 freshmen on the season. His four victories tied for No. 2 nationally and tied for the SEC lead in the category.
 
In four starts on the mound in 2020, MacLeod led the team in strikeouts (35), innings pitched (21.0) and wins, while ranking first among qualifying MSU pitchers in ERA (0.86) and opponents' batting average (.127). The left-hander held the opponents to two-or-fewer runs in all four starts and fanned seven-plus batters in three of four starts. He issued one-or-fewer walks in three of four starts and allowed just two extra base hits on the season.
 
2020 SEC Baseball Community Service Team
Alabama – Brock Guffey, Junior
Arkansas – Casey Opitz, Junior
Auburn – Conor Davis, Senior
Florida – Tommy Mace, Junior
Georgia – Emerson Hancock, Junior
Kentucky – Alex Degen, Sophomore
LSU – Matthew Beck, Senior
Ole Miss – Tim Elko, Junior
Mississippi State – Christian MacLeod, Redshirt-Freshman
Missouri – Spencer Juergens, Senior
South Carolina – Cam Tringali, Redshirt-Sophomore
Tennessee – Luc Lipcius, Junior
Texas A&M – Christian Roa, Junior
Vanderbilt – Harrison Ray, Senior
 
In a continuing effort to recognize the accomplishments of student-athletes beyond the field of competition, the Southeastern Conference names a Community Service Team for each of its 21 league-sponsored sports, looking to highlight student-athletes from each school who gives back to the community through superior service efforts.

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Kenley Hawk

by Brian Ogden, Assistant Director/Communications
 
STARKVILLE – The car slowed to a stop. The engine cut out and she could hear the door open. Sunlight flooded in as the trunk lid opened slowly and a pair of hands reached in. Bentley squinted in the sun as she was lifted out of the car and handed to her new mother.
 
Kenley Hawk couldn't help but gasp when she saw her for the first time. She'd been begging her parents to let her get a puppy of her own since the season ended. Hawk held Bentley in the April sun for the first of many photos she's posted on social media as the pup grows.
 
"When we got her, she could probably fit in both of my hands," Hawk said. "Now, she's 12 pounds. It's a big difference. She couldn't get up the steps, couldn't go down the steps, but now she looks at the other dogs like 'Move, I've got this.'"
 
As she's grown, Bentley's found her way into more trouble. There was the shoe phase. It was short-lived. A quick bump on the behind with the shoe she was gnawing on ended that fascination. Luckily, she's not much for furniture Hawk said.
 
Mississippi State's freshman pitcher has spent most of her free time taking the little goldendoodle on walks and working on training. Bentley's found mud pits to dig in, stumbled off the porch and fallen asleep with her face in her food bowl.
 
She's gotten the hang of sit and stay, but some of the more advanced tricks have challenged her.
 
"I think to lay down, that's probably the hardest," Hawk said. "She'll sit down and bow her head, but then she looks at me like, 'Did I do it?'"
 
Training her dog has given Hawk a better appreciation for her coaches as she sees the similarities with practicing and perfecting her pitches.
 
"We have to sit here and it has to be repetitive," she said. "I kind of have to do that with pitching, but now this time, I'm the teacher. I'm not the student, so it's different."
 
We have to sit here and it has to be repetitive. I kind of have to do that with pitching, but now this time, I'm the teacher. I'm not the student, so it's different.
 
When she looks back at the 2020 season, Hawk's best description of the year is simply "unexpected." It wasn't just the sudden end that made her feel that way. It was also how surprised she was by what she didn't know when she got to campus.
 
Hawk realized she hadn't perfected her motion the way she thought she had in high school. She was discouraged at first. This is what she was supposed to be good at, and instead it seemed like everyone had everything figured out except for her.
 
"At first, I think it was kind of a shock, how much it took to get better," she said. "I think, of course, I settled in fast. I didn't really have a choice."
 
The Bulldogs pitching coach Josh Johnson helped with that. The numbers clearly show his impact on the staff. State went from second-to-last in the SEC with a 3.36 ERA in 2019 to ranking fourth in the nation in 2020 at 1.36.
 
"Listening to Josh talk and how much knowledge he has and what all he's been through with men's fastpitch softball and how I could use that since he was such a strong drop ball pitcher, I guess after I figured out I was a drop ball pitcher, it hit home. You know, I really need to take in everything he says," Hawk said.
 
It still wasn't easy for her. She would grow frustrated when the results didn't match her expectations. Hawk knew she could execute her pitches but didn't understand why she was struggling to hit her spots. Normally, she could break down her delivery herself and pinpoint what was going wrong, but now she was having to relearn her mechanics.
 
"I was not a very patient person when I graduated, but when I got to college I realized there is a process," she said. "You just have to trust it and lean on it. Being trained and finally trusting the process felt great. Now, I'm kind of taking that with Bentley. It's a process."
 
Listening to Josh talk and how much knowledge he has and what all he's been through with men's fastpitch softball and how I could use that since he was such a strong drop ball pitcher, I guess after I figured out I was a drop ball pitcher, it hit home. You know, I really need to take in everything he says.
 
One of the biggest reasons Hawk wanted a dog was to have a companion when she goes hiking. Her family often hikes to the top of Pinnacle Mountain, which is about an hour and a half from their house. The trips take a few hours to reach the summit where they'll stop for lunch before trekking back down.
 
Bentley is already being conditioned for a life in the outdoors by Hawk's side. She's spent some time in a kayak – on dry land for now – to get used to sitting in the small space. Walks have been the most important step. Bentley stays right next to her people for now, so Hawk is optimistic she'll do alright off the leash on the trail.
 
In her second outing this spring, Hawk was let off her own leash in a way. Against Tennessee State in the Bulldogs' first home weekend of the year, she threw 6. innings in scoreless ballgame while striking out five batters. She was only lifted in the seventh after State put up the only runs of the game in bottom of the sixth.
 
Hawk points to that game as her biggest moment of growth in 2020.
 
"It was like wow you can be successful with one of your strongest pitches," she said. "You don't need seven, eight, nine pitches. You can just live off your strengths. That's when I realized if I really worked for it and I just pushed myself, then I could be good."
 
That had been Johnson's message to her all year. She just had to trust his process and learn to embrace it.
 
"I'm extremely stubborn and hard-headed, and I know this," Hawk said. "I guess it runs in the family. Bentley is too. If I ever gave Josh trouble in the fall, now I know what it's like."
 
Hawk is looking forward to her second season in Starkville, this time with Bentley along for the adventure. But she knows her family will miss having the puppy at home. While she can still fit, Bentley likes to sleep behind the toilet. It's a strange place to nap, but it will feel even stranger when she's not there anymore.
 
"I think it's going to be extremely hard," Hawk said. "Every morning everyone goes in there to look for her. I think right now that's just the routine, but when I leave in a couple of months, it's going to be 'Oh my gosh, nobody's behind the toilet now.'"

I'm extremely stubborn and hard-headed, and I know this. I guess it runs in the family. Bentley is too. If I ever gave Josh trouble in the fall, now I know what it's like.

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Ashley Gilliam

by Shelby Spurlock, Student Assistant/Communications
 
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. – After posting one of the strongest campaigns in Mississippi State women's golf history, freshman Ashley Gilliam was named First Team All-SEC and earned a spot on the All-Freshman Team, as announced by the league office on Thursday.
 
"Ashley, what an incredible season for her," said head coach Ginger Brown-Lemm. "Best season on record at Mississippi State for any player ever. She grew and expanded her commitment to training in all the areas we have elite performance coaches available. The result is a far more prepared, mature and physically ready-to-compete athlete. Hard work on a student-athlete's part pays huge dividends for them now, here at Mississippi State University and in their future endeavors."
 
In addition to these honors, Gilliam has also been named an All-American by Golfweek and the WGCA. She's the first Bulldogs to earn first team honors since Solheim Cup selection and former All-American Ally McDonald received the recognition in 2015 and is just the sixth Mississippi State player to earn the status overall. Gilliam joined McDonald and Jessica Peng as the only players to be named to the All-Freshman Team.
 
Gilliam ranked sixth in Division I, second in the SEC and set the MSU program record with a 70.61 season stroke average. She broke the State freshman records for Rounds of Par or Better (13) and Rounds in the 60s (5). Her overall performance for the year earned her a sixth-place ranking in the most recent Arnold Palmer Cup standings.
 
Overall, Gilliam ended the season ranked 43rd in the country after posting four top-10 finishes, including three performances inside the top-three. She was named SEC Golfer of the Week after finishing tied for second at the Westbrook Spring Invitational, where she shot 203, marking the second-lowest score in MSU history, and was 13-under-par, matching the program record for score in relation to par. Gilliam ended the year by shooting 10-consecutive rounds of par or better.
 
For more information on the Bulldogs, follow MSU women's golf on Twitter, like them on Facebook and join them on Instagram by searching for "HailStateWG."

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Hunter Renfroe


STARKVILLE - Spending some time catching up with some of our alums in professional baseball, HailState.com's Jalyn Johnson to talk about how they are managing their time away from the game, what they are doing during the quarantine and some memories from their time at Mississippi State.

Press play on the video above to watch the latest interview with Hunter Renfroe (2011-13).

#STATEtoTheShow Quarantine Check-Ins
April 9 - Brandon Woodruff
April 14 - Adam Frazier
April 23 - Jonathan Holder
May 5 - Kendall Graveman
May 15 - Mitch Moreland
May 20 - Hunter Renfroe

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